Sleep Specialists Cedar City UT

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Urology Associates Adult and Pediatric Urology
(435) 867-0325
1303 North Main Street
Cedar City, UT
 
Kourosh Ghaffari Faap
(435) 586-0077
1333 North Main Street
Cedar City, UT
 
Pearson Alan Cfnp
(435) 865-7227
1251 Northfield Road # 301
Cedar City, UT
 
Valley View Medical Center
(435) 868-5500
1303 North Main Street
Cedar City, UT
 
Brian Neil Burrows, MD
(435) 865-0218
689 S 75 E
Cedar City, UT
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St George'S Univ, Sch Of Med, St George'S, Grenada
Graduation Year: 2002

Data Provided By:
Bunker Clint DO
(435) 868-5500
1303 North Main Street
Cedar City, UT
 
IHC Health Center at Cedar City
(435) 868-5500
1303 North Main Street
Cedar City, UT
 
Smith Philip E MD
(435) 868-5500
1303 North Main Street
Cedar City, UT
 
Gray Family Medicine
(435) 586-7676
166 West 1325 North Suite 300
Cedar City, UT
 
Brian N Burrows
(435) 865-0218
1333 N Main St
Cedar City, UT
Specialty
Pediatrics

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Sleep Can Help or Hinder

Sleep can help or hinder

Posted by Mike Furci (01/25/2010 @ 9:46 am)

Too much or too little sleep can boost your risk of death, British researchers report.

“In terms of prevention, our findings indicate that consistently sleeping seven or eight hours a night is optimal for health,” study author Jane E. Ferrie, of University College London Medical School, said in a prepared statement.

Her team studied more than 8,000 people, aged 35 to 55, who were followed for a number of years.

Among participants who slept six, seven or eight hours a night at the start of the study, a decrease in nightly sleep duration was associated with a 110 percent excess risk of cardiovascular-related death.

Similarly, among those who slept seven or eight hours per night at the start of the study, an increase in nightly sleep duration was associated with a 110 percent excess risk of non-cardiovascular death.

The study appears in the Dec. 1 issue of Sleep.

On average, most adults need seven to eight hours of sleep per night to feel well-rested and alert, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

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Click here to read the rest of this article from BottomLineFitness.com