Weight Training Programs Hilo HI

Local resource for weight training programs in Hilo. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to bodybuilding programs, as well as advice and content on how to build muscles efficiently.

Curves Puna/Keaau
16-179 Melekahiwa Street
Keaau, HI
 
Health Haven Fitness
(808) 961-6989
Kaikoo Mall
Hilo, HI
 
Volcano International
(808) 933-2523
PO Box 6581
Hilo, HI
 
Orchid Isle Fitness
(808) 961-0003
29 Shipman St Ste 104
Hilo, HI
 
Aloha Fitness Club
(808) 933-1544
215 Railroad Ave # B2
Hilo, HI
 
Curves Puna/Keaau HI
16-179 Melekahiwa Street
Keaau, HI
Programs & Services
Aerobics, Body Sculpting, Cardio Equipment, Cardio Equipment, Circuit Training, Group Exercise Studio, Gym Classes, Gym Equipment, Gym Sports, Silver Sneakers, Zumba

Data Provided By:
Curves Hilo HI
101 Aupuni Street, #147
Hilo, HI
Programs & Services
Aerobics, Body Sculpting, Cardio Equipment, Cardio Equipment, Circuit Training, Group Exercise Studio, Gym Classes, Gym Equipment, Gym Sports, Silver Sneakers, Zumba

Data Provided By:
Orchid Isle Fitness
(808) 961-0003
29 Shipman St # 104
Hilo, HI
 
Kosei Exquisite Jewelry
(808) 969-9808
180 Makaala St # 1
Hilo, HI
 
Pace Health and Fitness Hawaii
(808) 935-7052
1266 Kamehameha Ave Ste A
Hilo, HI
 
Data Provided By:

Partial reps vs full range of motion

Partial reps vs full range of motion

Posted by Mike Furci (01/02/2010 @ 9:29 am)

I am not a huge fan of using partial reps, but will use them sparingly with experienced lifters to “through a wrench into their workout”. When I prescribe them they are performed after the client has already reached momentary concentric failure during a set. But, because partial reps place such high demands on the recovery ability of the muscles being worked, I caution against using them more than once every 4 workouts per body part. In reference to this belief, I received an email from an intermediate lifter claiming a study (J Strength Cond Res, 2004, 18(3), 518-521) proved partial reps should be incorporated in his workout instead of full range reps.?

I did a little research, as always, and found the study the gentleman was referencing. This study was conducted over a 10-week period using the bench press as the criterion measurement. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group one trained with full range of motion sets. Group two trained with partial range of motion sets. A partial range of motion was defined as two to five inches from full extension of the elbows. Group three trained with a combination of both partial and full range reps. All groups were pre and post-tested with a full range of motion one rep maximum. No differences were found between the groups. So should we or shouldn’t we use partial reps?

There are several problems I find with this study that are common to many studies trying to illuminate the most efficacious training principles. First, and perhaps most important, inexperienced, recreational subjects were used. Inexperienced subjects can achieve gains in the first few months on just about any program. Second, the length of time the study was conducted was entirely too short. six, eight or, like this study, 10 weeks is just not enough time to show the efficacy of a particular training protocol. And third, the intensit...

Click here to read the rest of this article from BottomLineFitness.com

Time Equals Muscle

Posted by Mike Furci (01/10/2010 @ 9:15 am)

A highly overlooked, but very useful tool for progressive resistance training is – Tempo. I will even go one step further and call tempo an essential tool for attaining optimum results from weight training. Yes, it’s true one can attain results performing reps just like every other hack in the gym, but I’m talking about optimum results.

If you’re going to spend the time in the gym, why not get the most out of it. The biggest reason most people who weight train don’t use tools like tempo is shear laziness. Performing a set to momentary failure, to the point where you can’t possibly get another rep is grueling. Few people have what it takes to train correctly, achieving 100% intensity. Hence, the legions of frustrated people in gyms across the US. Like any endeavor, doing your best takes hard work, focus and dedication.

So what is tempo? Tempo goes hand in hand with “time under tension” or TUT. TUT is simply the amount of time a muscle in under tension. To develop the optimum amount of muscle in the shortest amount of time, a set should last between 20 and 60 seconds.

Tempo is the speed of your reps. It is expressed and recorded by three or four digit numbers representing the seconds required to complete a rep. Example: 402 (four, zero, two) or 50X0 (five, zero, explosive, zero). Using the bench press, the first digit is the speed in which the weight is lowered (negative). The second digit is the amount of time one pauses once they’ve reached their chest. The third digit is the amount of time one takes to raise the weight (positive). The forth digit, if used, is the amount of time one takes before lowering the weight again. If an “X” is used, it means explosive, or as fast as possible.

Designing Your Workouts

Is it really necessary to count each rep in order to build strength and muscle? No. Is i...

Click here to read the rest of this article from BottomLineFitness.com